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Mongolia - Telecoms, Mobile and Internet

Mongolia - Telecoms, Mobile and Internet

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Meta Description Executive summary
Since the Mongolian Government’s telecommunications reform program in the mid-1990s, there has been effective
Publisher BuddeComm
Date of Report Jun 28, 2011
Quick Overview
Executive summary
Since the Mongolian Government’s telecommunications reform program in the mid-1990s, there has been effective liberalisation of all market segments, partial privatisation of the fixed-line incumbent operator, Mongolia Telecom, and establishment of an independent regulator. Mongolia acceded to the WTO in 1997.
Competition is in place for both fixed and mobile telephony including local, long-distance and international, internet, VoIP and VSATs. The internet market is a small but growing sector. Government initiatives such as the e-Mongolia National Program are helping to spread internet awareness and usage throughout the country.
The fixed-line network is declining rapidly while the mobile phone market has undergone a remarkable boom. The national policy has been to have a competitive telecommunications segment with two CDMA and two GSM mobile telephone service operators. Accordingly, two additional mobile licences were awarded in 2005/06 to Unitel (GSM) and rural mobile operator G-Mobile (CDMA).
As part of the transition to a market-based economy, Mongolia committed itself to modernising its telecommunications network and steadily introducing advanced communications services. The government considers national infrastructure development as a high priority and, in particular, it has focused on the development of the telecoms sector, seeing it as central to the overall development of the country, the improvement of living standards, increasing foreign investment, boosting tourism and private sector development, and implementation of innovative changes.
Market highlights:

Not all areas of Mongolia are connected to the internet. However, good progress has been made, with most universities and research institutes, government organisations, agencies, banks, and companies in Ulaanbaatar being online. Market penetration continues to remain strong in the urban centres, although the rural sector is catching up.
The number of e-commerce services such as e-banking, online shopping, and e-services has risen in Mongolia. This is partly attributed to a government initiative established in 2005 called the One Home One PC program providing low-cost computers for around US$250.
Broadband subscriptions are increasing and account for nearly 50% of internet subscriptions. Fibre to the Building deployments have also connected major buildings, hotels, schools, and government houses.
Since the launch of the two new mobile operators, subscribers have increased with uptake in rural areas. This has impacted on fixed-line subscriptions and put the national operator Telecom Mongolia under pressure.
MobiCom launched the country’s first 3G WCDMA mobile network in the country.Mongolia – key telecom parameters – 2006; 2009, 2011 (e)
Sector200620092011 (e)
Internet users310,000350,000390,000
Broadband subscribers3,50047,00081,000
Fixed-line subscribers195,000188,880135,000
Mobile phone subscribers721,0002,249,0202,750,000
Mobile penetration rate30%84%98%
(Source: BuddeComm based on industry data)
For those needing high level strategic analysis and objective analysis on Mongolia, this report is essential reading and gives further information on:

The jointly implemented project by the World Bank and the Mongolian Government called ‘Improvement of Information Telecommunication Infrastructure’. The fund was set up for the purpose of bringing telecommunications to rural and remote areas, at the same time expanding services and improving service quality. The project is due to be completed by the end of 2011.
Renewed efforts in 2009 to complete the privatisation of Mongolia Telecom. The operator continued to provide services throughout the country by leasing network assets from the Posts and Telecommunications Authority, which owned the infrastructure. Although Mongolia Telecom had been a very profitable company throughout most of the 1990s, the advent of mobile competition, international IP telephony providers and later on the substitution of international SMS for voice, all had a negative impact on its profit margins. By 2008 the major portion of its revenue was being gained through international telephone calls where the regulations meant it faced no competition.Mongolia is a small country with predominantly basic telecommunications services. The report covers trends and developments in telecommunications, mobile, internet and broadband. Subjects include:

Market and industry analyses, trends and developments;
Facts, figures and statistics;
Industry and regulatory issues;
Infrastructure;
Major players, subscribers;
Internet;
Mobile voice and data markets;
Broadband (FttH, DSL, cable TV).
Table of Contents

1. Executive summary
2. Key statistics
3. Country Overview
3.1 Background
3.2 Mongolia’s economy
4. Regulatory environment
4.1 Background
4.2 Communications Regulatory Commission (CRC)
4.3 Information Communication Technology and Post Authority of Mongolia (ICTPA)
4.3.1 National information technology park
4.3.2 National data centre
4.4 National ICT Committee
4.5 CIO Council
5. Telecommunications market
5.1 Overview of Mongolia’s telecom market
5.2 Mongolia’s telecom market – financial statistics
5.3 Mongolian Information and Communications Vision 2010
5.4 Interconnection
5.5 Policy progress - 2010
5.6 2021
5.7 Number of licensees – 2009, 2010
5.8 Law on unfair competition
6. Telecommunications infrastructure
6.1 National telecom network
6.1.1 Rural services
6.2 Fixed-line statistics
6.3 Wireless local loop statistics
6.4 International infrastructure
6.5 Satellite program
6.6 Chronological data of ICT developments in Mongolia
7. Vision of e-Mongolia
7.1 e-Mongolia status June 2009
7.2 E-government
7.3 On-line services
7.3.1 E-commerce and e-banking
7.3.2 E-Signatures
8. Internet market
8.1 Overview
8.2 Internet statistics
8.3 Internet infrastructure statistics
8.4 Mongolia internet Exchange (MIX)
8.5 ISP market
8.6 ISP charges
9. Broadband market
9.1 Overview
9.2 Broadband statistics
10. Television services
10.1 Satellite and terrestrial television services
10.2 Cable and MMDS television services
10.3 Digital TV
10.4 IPTV and Mobile TV
10.5 Television broadcasting standards by network type
11. Mobile communications Market
11.1 Overview of Mongolia’s mobile market
11.2 Mobile statistics
11.3 Mobile charges
11.4 3G Services
12. Fixed network operators in Mongolia
12.1 Mongolia Telecom
12.2 Mongolian Railways Communications
12.3 Ulusnet
13. Mobile network operators in Mongolia
13.1 MobiCom
13.2 SkyTel
13.3 Unitel
13.4 G-Mobile
14. Related reports
Table 1 – Country statistics Mongolia – 2011
Table 2 – Telecom revenue and investment statistics – 2010
Table 3 – Telephone network statistics – 2010
Table 4 – Internet user statistics – 2010
Table 5 – Mobile statistics – 2010
Table 6 – National telecommunications authorities
Table 7 – GDP and foreign direct investment: 2003 - 2011
Table 8 – Total revenue and investment of ICT sector and tax contribution: 2005 - 2010
Table 9 – ICT sector revenue breakdown - 2010
Table 10 – Licensees by service – 2009; 2010
Table 11 – Fixed lines in service and teledensity – 1990, 1995 – 2012
Table 12 – Local fixed-line telephone traffic – 1997 - 2009
Table 13 – Wireless local loop (WLL) lines in service – 2003 - 2010
Table 14 – Internet users – 1995 – 2011
Table 15 – Total fixed-line internet subscribers – 1998 - 2009
Table 16 – Total internet subscribers – 2005 – 2010
Table 17 – Different types of access to the internet – 2010
Table 18 – International internet bandwidth – 2000 – 2010
Table 19 – Number of PCs – 2000 – 2009
Table 20 – Market share of ISPs – 2009 – 2010
Table 21 – Broadband internet subscribers – 2001 – 2012
Table 22 – DSL subscribers – 2005 - 2010
Table 23 – TV subscribers by technology and TV sets – 2004 - 2009
Table 24 – Cable and MMDS TV subscribers – 2004 - 2009
Table 25 – Market share of CATV operators – 2009
Table 26 – TV license type, frequency, technical standard and coverage - 2010
Table 27 – Mobile total subscribers, prepaid subscribers, annual change and penetration rate – 1996 - 2012
Table 28 – Mobile operators and subscribers – June 2009, December 2010
Table 29 – Domestic mobile telephone traffic – 1999 - 2009
Table 30 – MMS and SMS traffic – 1999 - 2009
Table 31 – Mobile communication charges per minute - 2010
Table 32 – Telecom Mongolia revenue, EBITDA, net income – 2006 - 2011
Chart 1 – Mongolia GDP, GDP per capita and foreign direct investment: 2003 - 2011
Chart 2 – Total revenue and investment of ICT sector and tax contribution: 2005 - 2010
Chart 3 – ICT sector revenue breakdown - 2010
Chart 4 – Fixed and mobile market share by subscribers – 1998 - 2011
Chart 5 – Fixed lines in service and teledensity- 1998 - 2011
Chart 6 – Types of access to the internet - 2010
Chart 7 – Mobile subscribers and penetration: 1998 - 2011
Chart 8 – Mobile operator market share – December 2010
Chart 9 – Mobile communication charges per minute by operator: 2006 - 2010
Exhibit 1 – Map of Mongolia
Exhibit 2 – Chronological events of ICT developments in Mongolia: 1921 - 2011
Exhibit 3 – e-Mongolia programme – targets 2012; 2015




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